Glossary

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  • An edge that has been cut at a slant to create more visual interest, often seen on mirrors, openings in mats, and frames.
  • 100% cotton rag, acid free paper that is often used for printmaking and drawing. Each sheet is watermarked, "Arches France" and has two natural deckled edges and two tear deckled edges.
  • An area of finish which has developed an unintended a white or milky appearance usually form the result of exposure to moisture or elevated levels of humidity.
  • A raised area, bulge or bubble on the surface of an object that occurs between adjacent layers of different materials. This loss of adhesion may be due from exposure to excessive heat or incompatibility to materials.
  • An area of finish which has developed an unintended a white or milky appearance usually form the result of exposure to moisture or elevated levels of humidity.
  • Colored clay layer mixed with glue size. The tonality of bole can vary depending on the time period and region of the fabrication of the frame.
  • The fold or joint in the endpaper between the pastedown and the fly leaf
  • A mat where the window mat is hinged along the longest side to the ragboard mount, thus resembling a book.
  • Often observed in works on paper with acid burn or high levels of acidity, which are weak, inflexible and easily broken.
  • Convex glass is curved outward and is usually oval in shape. It was commonly used in the late 19th century in framing of photographic portraits. It is also prominent as a support for reverse painted glass.
  • A small pad made of felt or rubber that is placed on the back of the lower corner of frames. It prevents the frame from sliding on the wall, and also creates a small gap from the wall, for air circulation.
  • A polished, area of increased sheen resulting from intentional or accidental exposure to contact and/or friction.
  • Popular in the 1870s into the turn of the 20th century, it is a small albumen print that was mounted to cardstock typically measured 4 1/2" x 6 1/2"
  • Used as a filler in alkaline paper-making, as coating pigment and as a buffering agent. Often an ingredient in gesso.
  • Popular in the late 17th to mid 18th century this profile had an acanthus leaf at the site edge of the frame.
  • Popular in the 1860s and the same size as a calling card, it is a small albumen print that was mounted to cardstock.
  • Ornamental scrollwork that appears at corners and centers of ornate frames
  • A traditional aqueous, milk based paint.
  • Italian for "small frame", characterized by a central flat panel or frieze with a raised moulding adorning the outer edge and sight edge.
  • An artistic technique that uses wood pulp or paper fiber to craft three dimensional sculptures using a mold. It may refer to full sculpture or relief designs. One example is papier-mâché.
  • Thick lines present in laid paper created by the thin wires present in the paper mould/screen.
  • (1863-1948) Canadian-American Post-Impressionist artist who also designed and fabricated frames. The younger brother of the artist, Maurice Prendergast.
  • A photographic process that reproduces film images on photographic paper using multiple layers of dyes in a polyester base.
  • An archival box that stores documents, artwork, maps, books, etc. Frequently custom made to safely store fragile books. Boxes can be customized with a variety of materials including bookcloth, marbled paper, leather eterior, tooling, etc. Used in private collections, museums and libraries.
  • Glass that is treated with a metal amalgam that results a clear image.
  • A hanging system comprised of a wood or metal moulding used in pairs, where one half is mounted directly to the wall, and the matching half is affixed to the frame.
  • Generally refers to a "frameless" picture frame, wherein the image is pressed between two sheets of glass or one sheet of glass and a rigid backing with a series of clips. This system leaves the edges of a work and if applicable, matting; exposed and vulnerable to exposure to moisture and(...)
  • A frame where the ornamentation and finish is applied after the frame has been joined. Resulting in a frame where the miters are not visible at the corners.
  • A hanging metal wire that is covered in a clear or opaque plastic coating. Coating provides additional strength, helps prevent oxidation of the metal in the wire, and protects it from fraying.
  • A substance such as wax or varnish that is applied to the surface to change or protect it.
  • Small moulding that is often used as a design element along the edges of drawers.
  • A certificate of insurance is a document that is used to provide information on specific insurance coverage.
  • A textured with a heavy tooth used a support for watercolor and archival printing.
  • An abbreviation for "composition ornamentation", a method of applying cast designs to adorn frames, prior to the finish process gilding. An alternative to hand carved elements.
  • The treatment or action to prolong the existence of an object with the least possible intervention
  • Acrylic, a clear shatter resistant glazing that blocks up to 99% UV rays.
  • Clear glass that blocks up 99% UV rays.
  • terms used to describe varying means to address damages sustained to an item. The decision to restore or conserve an item is based on a number of factors including but not limited to the item’s age, rarity, historic significance, and provenance. Conservation is appropriate when the above(...)
  • Stabilization of a surface through application of reversible adhesives.
  • Glass that is curved outward and is usually oval in shape. It was commonly used in the late 19th century in framing of photographic portraits. It is also prominent as a support for reverse painted glass.
  • Leaf that is 99.9% copper. It can be sealed to avoid tarnishing, or intentionally patinated to create the desired effect.
  • A decorative element applied on the corner of a frame. Often used on gilded, reeded profiles.
  • A plastic version of cardboard that is waterproof and light weight often used for backing board.
  •  Paper or matboard made from 100% cotton fiber. Unlike most paper made from wood pulp, cotton rag paper is stronger, more durable, acid-free, and suitable for archival use.
  • A concave scoop present on a profile.
  • Heavier paper or board that attaches to the text block.
  • A network of fine cracks in a varnish or paint layer, which may be caused by a number of different deterioration mechanisms; e.g. different rates of drying, or expansion and contraction between two layers, or the increasing brittleness of one layer relative to another.
  • A fold or an interruption in the planar surface that does not break through the support.
  • Composed of alphacellulose face paper, core and backing, the board is acid-free and lignin free, fade and bleed resistant. Available in over 400 shades and surface treatments with sheet size up to 40" x 60" in select shades. This is a popular option for creative designs with an acid free(...)
  • Composed of 100% cotton fiber ragboard used for archival supports and matting. Fade and bleed resistant. Naturally acid-free and lignin free. Available in 37 shades with sheet size up to 48" x 60" in white.

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